Web Content tagged posts

Web content writing – Are you over-reliant on PPC?

Fact – Your website needs increased traffic to raise sales
Fact – Search engines remain the number one way for people to discover your website
Fact – Paid search results can get you to the top of Google rankings (ish)

Obviously you should be concentrating your online marketing budget on PPC right?

Wrong! Consider the following stats:

  • 85% of search engine traffic comes via organic links
  • Only 11% of advertisers report achieving a higher ROI through a Pay Per Click Advertising Program than an Organic Search Engine Optimization program
  • 4 out of 5 (80%) of search engine users never click on PPC results
  • 86% of search engine users report they feel organic listings are more relevant than paid listings (Source: Zero One Zero)

And what about the following quote from Marc Resnick’s semina...

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How not to write good copy – lessons from the Kaiser Chiefs

© Drew de F Fawkes

Incredibly (inexplicably?) popular, the Kaiser Chiefs have been churning out “indie rock” for the past 15 years. Although their records are undeniable best-sellers (1.1 million singles and counting), they are also notable for having some of the dodgiest lyrics imaginable.

But this is not necessarily a bad thing – particularly for the copywriter determined to improve their own skills.

So without further ado, here are three things the Kaiser Chiefs can teach you about bad copywriting.

1. A bad rhyme is a crime

Everyday I love you less and less
I can’t believe once you and me did sex
It makes me sick to think of you undressed
Since everyday I love you less and less

Everyday I love you less and less – Employment – 2004

Kaiser Chief songs are notable for their over-reliance on rhyme, leading to...

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Why I don’t do SEO copywriting any more

There’s a reasonable chance that you arrived here at Tech Write looking for SEO copywriting services. There’s a slim chance that you may have even been sent here by Google after searching “SEO copywriting”. Because once upon a time everyone wanted SEO-optimised text. And I was more than happy to oblige.

But the fact is that I don’t do SEO copywriting any more.

Why not?

The answer is simple – the days of keyword stuffing, grammar mangling and Google-manipulation are over. For quite some time in fact. I could still produce something that would have suited the search engine optimisation techniques of old.

But I won’t.

Not only would I be robbing you of your marketing budget, but the results would be of limited success too...

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Monday musing – is it time to Americanize?

Stupid question, right? But…

1. The success of the World Wide Web has been led by US companies.
2. The rest of the world has got used to reading website text in ‘American’ English.

You can even prove it for yourself. Try Googling words with British and American spellings – you can bet there will be more results for the latter.

Picture of American English being selected from the language settings for a copywriting project

Cloud global copywriting success hinge on choosing American English spellings for your webpages?

Merrie Olde England

The ‘British English’ copywriter is probably gnashing their teeth at this point. Why would you want to sully your website with a bastardised variant of your mother tongue?

Because on the world stage, you look provincial. Quaint even. Like a throwback from Merrie Olde England.

If your business hopes to use the Internet to go global, you need to speak th...

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“Not provided” and how to screw Google back

Google has announced plans they say are designed to protect the privacy of people using their search engine. The idea is to encrypt the search terms we use, thereby preventing anyone from spying on what we are looking for. In future webmasters will see nothing but “not provided” in their website logs.

Google already uses the same technique to encrypt searches performed by users of their other services, such as Gmail or Drive. Anything you search for is encrypted so that not even website owners know exactly what you were looking for when you land on their site. The idea is to extend this same privacy to anyone using Google search.

Picture of a question mark in response to "not provided" from Google Analytics

What are your visitors searching for? You’ll never know thanks to “not provided”.

But this promise of privacy is, of course, complete rubbish...

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